Jeffrey Sanderson

18th Street Pilsen Open Studios - 2021

1708 W 19th St, Chicago, IL 60608, USA

HOME STUDIO

Open to the public: October 16th & 17th / 12-8pm
* Indoor Studio
* Masks required for all guests, to be worn correctly, over the mouth and nose. Vaccination expected and encouraged for all guests.


CONNECTION TO PILSEN:


We moved here a decade ago from Rogers Park, and were drawn to this unique community by the people, architecture, and spaces. We are thankful for the close connections we've made with our neighbors, as we raise our son here, and make art.


ARTIST BIO/STATEMENT:


I have been engaged with an intuitive and exploratory home studio practice steadily for over 20 years. My work includes non-objective oil painting, along with an ongoing series of assemblages and collage. My focus over the years has been on the work itself and developing a language and voice. 


Marks, layers, and the elements assembled as artworks depend upon and celebrate the remarkable sensitivity and uncanny memory that humans possess. I remember artmaking as a child, when narrative, representation, detail, and intentions surrounding these were my priorities. After moving away from making art, and moving to the United States from my home in Canada at age 16, I returned to art a year later as a college student. This lucky decision has altered the course of my life. In art school, I was exposed to intuitive mark-making and I became attentive to the materials and their placement as an end in itself.


My own paintings are improvised; paint deposits notions, reactions, and even jokes, by way of the sticky colored-butters and powders. These paintings depend on form, color, and the tactile realities of paint. I think in terms of looseness, thickness, color, and layers. These marks and fields gather and feed off one another, before they somehow settle and dry. My painting moves constitute a series of spontaneous choices, as I respond to the changing whole. Marks arrive through questions about what goes where, and about what conglomeration would finally feel the thing that makes the painting done with me. I love that paint can be anthropological; it can preserve marks and evidence of a conversation between a maker and a surface. One can feel a scale, a balance, or imbalance by being open to looking and lingering for awhile.  -- Jeffrey Sanderson